The Incarnation and the Possibility of Theology as Science: Toward a Post-Wittgenstein Appreciation

“Wovon man nicht sprechen kann, darüber muss man schweigen.” [Thereof one cannot speak, thereover one must be silent.” (Ludwig Wittgenstein, Tractatus Logico-Philosophicus, proposition 7) Wittgenstein’s contention seems reasonable enough: If something transcends (or even falls below?) the ambit of human discourse, our total “language game” – the words we use and how we use them – … More The Incarnation and the Possibility of Theology as Science: Toward a Post-Wittgenstein Appreciation

A Response to an Objection to Obeying the Lenten Law of Abstinence

On one Ash Wednesday over the last few years, I noticed a fellow Catholic was preparing to eat meat, and asked him if he realized it was Ash Wednesday; this Catholic then – rightly – did away with his plans to eat this meat. Someone nearby then suggested that abstaining from meat was silly, by … More A Response to an Objection to Obeying the Lenten Law of Abstinence

Answers to Unasked Questions: The Lesson of the Pair of Glasses

Just the other day, I realized that one of the ear guards that was supposed to be attached to the end of one of the temples of my pair of glasses had gone missing. Looking back, it seems to me I had realized in some inchoate way over the last few days that something about … More Answers to Unasked Questions: The Lesson of the Pair of Glasses

Why Sodom was Fire-and-Brimstone-ed: Clearing Up a Misconception

Then the men said to Lot, “Have you any one else here? Sons-in-law, sons, daughters, or any one you have in the city, bring them out of the place; for we are about to destroy this place, because the outcry against its people has become great before the Lord, and the Lord has sent us … More Why Sodom was Fire-and-Brimstone-ed: Clearing Up a Misconception

A Reflection on the Exasperating Ending to Carl Orff’s ‘O Fortuna’

I don’t know about my readers, but I’ve found the ending of Carl Orff’s musical setting for O Fortuna to be exasperating. The poem itself – last in the collection of poems called Carmina Burana – decries and bemoans the cruelty of the apparent reality of fate, recognizing at the same time the futility of any … More A Reflection on the Exasperating Ending to Carl Orff’s ‘O Fortuna’